Pharmacies:
The Face of Neighborhood Healthcare
People trust pharmacies for answers in times of need. We want to help provide quality, collaborative policy solutions, just like we provide health and wellness solutions to millions of patients and consumers every day.
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NACDS member pharmacies:
2,785,280
people employed
47,472
locations in the United States
Pharmacies Are: Accessible
Compared to all healthcare delivery entities tested, voters are most likely to think pharmacies are easy to access.
A pie chart showing 83 percent

83%

of voters in America say pharmacies are easy to access.
A pie chart showing 80 percent

80%

of voters have visited a pharmacist in the past 12 months.
Pharmacies Are: Innovative
Pharmacists help patients use medicines safely and stay healthy. Their extensive education empowers them to do even more to improve patient health and quality of life. That’s why voters continue to support Medicare enrollees being able to receive basic healthcare services from their pharmacists.
A pie chart showing 65 percent

65%

In 2019, 7 in 10 voters support allowing Medicare enrollees to receive basic healthcare services from their pharmacists.
A pie chart showing 67 percent

67%

In 2018, 2 in 3 voters supported allowing Medicare enrollees to receive basic healthcare services from their pharmacists.
A pie chart showing 75 percent

75%

of voters support enhancing patient access to newer pharmacy services such as vaccinations, testing for flu and step, and helping patients manage disease such as diabetes.
Out-of-Pocket Drug Cost Issue Focus
Voters trust pharmacists' advice on reducing out-of-pocket drug costs, and want to hear pharmacies' public policy recommendations in this area.
72%
Of voters are more likely to support a Congressional candidate who reduces out-of-pocket prescription drugs and healthcare costs by acting on recommendations from pharmacists and others healthcare professionals.
65%
are more likely to support a Congressional candidate who helps to advance policies that increase access to basic healthcare services by allowing pharmacists and other healthcare professionals to better use their education and training.
79%
Of voters somewhat or strongly approve of the new bipartisan law that eliminates the “pharmacy gag clause” and allows pharmacists to tell consumers about less expensive prescription options - with 66% strongly approving.
86%
Of voters somewhat or strongly support pharmacists using their expertise to identify other opportunities in public policy which can help to lower patients’ out-of-pocket costs - with 66% strongly supporting.
7 in 10 voters view pharmacists as credible sources when it comes to information about how to save money on prescription drugs. (68%)
Opioid Issue Focus
When thinking about the opioid epidemic, voters are more likely to think pharmacies are mostly part of the solution rather than the problem - of the options tested, a unique distinction that pharmacies or pharmacists share with law enforcement.

43%

Part of the Solution

24%

Part of the Problem
A pie chart showing 58 percent

58%

of voters somewhat or strongly support rules that would limit the initial fill of certain opioid prescriptions to seven days as a way to reduce the likelihood that a patient becomes addicted and to reduce the number of opioids out there in the public domain.
A pie chart showing 61 percent

61%

of voters somewhat or strongly support rules that all prescriptions must be handled electronically, rather than paper or fax prescriptions, to reduce the likelihood of fraud and abuse of prescriptions.
A pie chart showing 65 percent

65%

of voters somewhat or strongly support rules that allow pharmacists to work with Medicare patients to help prevent, detect or treat potential opioid abuse, such as screening for potential misuse, providing patient education resources, fostering awareness of the overdose antidote, helping patients with drug disposal options, and coordinating with physicians.
Methodology: This poll was conducted from January 04-06, 2019, among a national sample of 1995 Registered Voters. The interviews were conducted online and the data were weighted to approximate a target sample of Registered Voters based on age, race/ethnicity, gender, educational attainment, and region. Results from the full survey have a margin of error of plus or minus 2 percentage points.